Legends say that it is the Devil’s throut / 20 km. from Gela/ where Orpheus went to bring back Eurydice. His songs were so beautiful that Hades finally agreed to allow Eurydice to return to the world of the living. However, Orpheus had to meet one condition: he had to not look back as he was conducting her to the surface. Just before the pair reached the upper world, Orpheus looked back, and Eurydice slipped back into the netherworld once again.
Orpheus was inconsolable at this second loss of his wife. He spurned the company of women and kept apart from ordinary human activities. A group of Ciconian Maenads, female devotees of Dionysus, came upon him one day as he sat singing beneath a tree. They attacked him, throwing rocks, branches, and anything else that came to hand. However, Orpheus’ music was so beautiful, that it charmed even inanimate objects, and the missiles refused to strike him. Finally, the Maenads’ attacked him with their own hands, and tore him to pieces. Orpheus’ head floated down the river of Gela, still singing, and came to rest on the isle of Lesbos.